Saturday, February 10, 2018

Nonfiction Poetry is My #nf10for10 for 2018!

The idea of nonfiction information in a poetic form that keeps showing up in my shopping cart or library stacks.  I think it's intriguing to see how factual information is shared through poetry.  Sometimes the information is observational and sometimes it's filled with scientific vocabulary in small bursts that makes the reader stop and think.  Creating room to ponder and wonder more.  Thank you for joining us today by sharing or reading posts related to nonfiction literature.  



Earth Verse Haiku from the Ground Up
author Sally M Walker
illustrator William Grill

I feel blessed to have this preview copy and shared a lot about it yesterday in detail for Poetry Friday.






What in the Wild?  Mysteries of Nature Concealed...and Revealed
author David M Schwartz and Yael Schy
photographs by Dwight Kuhn

poems written as clues
three page spread with the middle being a full page photo confirms your guess
traditional nonfiction text on the third page





lizards, frogs, and polliwogs
author Douglas Florian
paintings by Douglas Florian

poems that describe physical characteristics
tells about actions and movements
fun with word layout




I'm going to sneak in some more by Douglas Florian.  He was my first nonfiction poet years and I always found his books a way to connect animal lovers and boys to poetry.







Now You See Them Now You Don't Poems About Creatures that Hide
Author David Harrison
Illustrated by Giles Laroche

poems about animals that hide
you have to find them in illustrations
how they can be hidden shared via poetry






comets, stars, the moon, and mars
Author Douglas Florian
paintings by Douglas Florian

the art in this text is beautiful
lots of factual information 
planet features beautifully shared






Woodpecker Wham!
Author April Pulley Sayre
Illustrations Steve Jenkins

various woodpeckers are illustrated
all the poems teach about woodpeckers
poems are short, good for early readers








A Place to Start a Family Poems About Creatures That Build
Author David L Harrison
Illustrated by Giles Laroche

love the collage illustrations
learn about the importance of nest building
why nests are built

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Friday, February 9, 2018

Earth Verse - Haiku from the Ground Up

Author Sally M. Walker
Illustrator William Grill
Candlewick Press, 2018
review copy provided by the publisher

Earth Verse - Haiku from the Ground Up is stunning and available February 13th.  I was so surprised by the amount of geological information shared via haiku form.  This past summer I spent some time writing haiku myself and was stuck using a 5-7-5 syllable because that is what I grew up this was the form for haiku.  A kind poetry friend suggested I could be fluid with my syllable form and I was a little surprised.  I wish I had this book as a mentor text because the syllable format is short and flexible line by line.  

I'm really intrigued with nonfiction poetry lately and this piece is my new favorite.  Three short lines are jammed packed with factual information.  The vocabulary is rich with geological words along with poetic form of comparisons.  I just have to share an example with you.

fragile outer crust.
shell around mantle and core --
Earth:  a hard-boiled egg

At first I thought the illustrations were done in chalk but they aren't.  They are done with colored pencils.  Making this a great illustrative mentor text because colored pencils are an easy accessible medium for every child.  Another illustrative feature I hope all readers discover is the symbol in the bottom right corner replacing page numbers.  The symbols help organize the poems into landform categories and the back of the book gives the reader more information about these landforms.  

Thank you Sally at sallymurphy.com.au for hosting Poetry Friday this week.

Thursday, February 8, 2018

Gaston

written by Kelly DiPucchio 
illustrated by Christian Robinson
atheneum Books for Young Readers, 2014
review copy from school library


I don't know why I'm just discovering this dog story.  I love dog stories and have a tub of dog story picture books in my classroom which this book needs to be in.  Mrs. Poodle has a litter of four puppies and you the reader follows them as they grow and learn to do poodle things.  Did you know proper poodles sip not slobber?  Did you know they yip not ruff?  Did you know they walk with grace and not race?  I did not know these things about poodles.  Mrs. Poodle has one puppy that is a bit different, Gaston.  He tends to do the things proper pooches don't do.  Things I know dogs to do.  Gaston has some great qualities while being a bit different, "Whatever the lesson, Gaston always worked the hardest, practiced the longest, and smiled the biggest."  

One day while walking in the park with her proper pooches Mrs. Poodle meets Mrs. Bulldog and her puppies.  Something is different about her litter of puppies.  It appears as if there was a switch between the two litters somehow.  I have to stop right now because I don't want to give away the best ending ever.  This book is about belonging, a super reader strength and figuring out you can belong and be a little different at the same time.  Hopefully readers will also discuss how trying new things is a positive but in the end belonging is important and needed.  There's also comfort in going back to something you know.

I just love the warm muted soft tones used for the illustrations.  They really help foster the warmth of this story.

Thursday, January 18, 2018

The Glorkian Warrior Delivers A Pizza {Exploring Graphic Novels}

This week I'm exploring and getting to know more about graphic novels for younger readers.  On Sunday I celebrated what began this journey, with Being Out of My Reading Comfort Zone.  

The Glorkian Warrior Delivers a Pizza by James Kochalka is funny and full of fantasy ideas.  The Glorkian Warrior is a three eyed skinny alien.  He gets a call to deliver a pizza and has quite the journey trying to get this done.  Glorikan Warrior and his side kick,  super backpack have a super car they aren't too sure how to drive.  They run into Glonk; a giant who loves pizza.  However, the reader will soon discover Glonk may not really be a giant.  Then there's an egg from a space ship which means an alien baby for them to interact with.  Their interactions are charming and humorous.  The pizza eventually gets delivered but they find out the journey may not have been necessary.

I learned graphic novels aren't always quick reads.  This book took some time for me to read, several short sessions.  There's more action than my previous reads this week and the illustrations were key in showing this.  The colors were also selected and organized to help tell each chapter. 

Wednesday, January 17, 2018

The Many Adventures of Johnny Mutton {Exploring Graphic Novels}

On Sunday, I celebrated Being Our of My Reading Comfort Zone with Ruth Ayers and community.  It's been about ten years since Baby Mouse and Lunch Lady entered my life.  I've been teaching younger grades recently and thought I would share books I'm exploring to learn more about graphic novels myself.  I'm also not going to google - What is a graphic novel?, until next weekend.  I want to explore, learn on my own and share my learning here.


The Many Adventures of Johnny Mutton written and illustrated by James Proimos is filled with six short stories.  A great feature for transitional readers who might be striving to retain longer stories.  The first story is a story we are all familiar with...a baby left on the front porch of a house.  But this baby isn't a human baby, it's a baby sheep who a human agrees to raise and care for.  This sets Johnny up for being a little bit different which guides his adventures and interactions with others.  He is funny and I really enjoyed his twists that make him successful in unlikely situations for a sheep.



I learned graphic novels can have short stories that can stand alone.  This graphic novel seemed to have more story through out the book above or below the graphic box making the reading a bit more involved than just speech bubbles.  As a reader, I love epilogues and this book has a follow up for each character on a page titled; Where Are They Now?

Tuesday, January 16, 2018

Johnny Boo {Exploring Graphic Novels}

On Sunday, I celebrated Being Our of My Reading Comfort Zone with Ruth Ayers and community.  It's been about ten years since Baby Mouse and Lunch Lady entered my life.  I've been teaching younger grades recently and thought I would share books I'm exploring to learn more about graphic novels myself.  I'm also not going to google - What is a graphic novel?, until next weekend.  I want to explore, learn on my own and share my learning here.



Johnny Boo The Best Little Ghost in the World! by James Kochalka is a fun story about two ghost friends and an ice cream monster.  As you might imagine an ice cream monster is a fun loving character and not that scary at all.  Squiggle and Johnny Boo start the book with a game of chase.  Their friendship has dialogue I'm sure our students can encounter on the playground.  Language around super powers, cheating, and sorries.  They decide to get ice cream and have strong feelings that the ice cream monster is mean.  I don't think anyone who likes ice cream can be mean.  It's a cute ending about becoming friends and solving worries.

I learned graphic novels can have chapters.  This book is illustrated in just five colors and I like that color scheme.  It seemed less busy than others in my stack and let me focus not he words; in and out of speech bubbles.  This is obviously in the genre of fantasy which made me think about graphic novels being a format; not a genre.  I just discovered there are several stories with Johnny Boo for my readers who love series books.

Monday, January 15, 2018

Morning Mystery {Exploring Graphic Novels}

Yesterday I celebrated Being Our of My Reading Comfort Zone with Ruth Ayers and community.  It's been about ten years since Baby Mouse and Lunch Lady entered my life.  I've been teaching younger grades recently and thought I would share books I'm exploring to learn more about graphic novels myself.  I'm also not going to google - What is a graphic novel?, until next weekend.  I want to explore and learn on my own.

Morning Mystery by Christianne C Jones and illustrated by Remy Simard is part of a series, My 1st Graphic Novel.  I fell in love with this book before I even read it because after the title page there is guidance for the reader, How to Read a Graphic Novel.  Perfect even for me, an adult reader.  

Brynn is too tired to get up in the morning and has a rough start.  There is water in her slippers.  The toothpaste went everywhere; creating a mess.  After pouring her milk at breakfast she noticed it was green!  She looks around the kitchen for clues and finds answers when her mom turns the calendar for the month.  I think readers will really enjoy finding out who is behind her unusual morning start.  

I learned graphic novels can be realistic fiction.  The layout can be easy for readers with just one - three text boxes to navigate per page.  With the help from the How to Read a Graphic Novel I carefully read each box of text and illustrations in order to increase my comprehension and joy.  I also think this book would make a great guided reading group because the story line is easy to follow and relatable for students.